CHAPTER 4: Finding and Analyses

     

    CHAPTER 4
    Finding and Analysis

    Links to Journal Agrotourism

    Summary, Chapter 1, Chapter 2, Chapter 3, Chapter 4, Chapter 5, Project Research, Authors

    The collected data are analyzed and interpreted to describe the current situation of tourism and agriculture in Bali particularly areas selected as case studies comprise Bayung Gede, Candi Kuning, Blimbingsari, and Pelaga Villages represent agrotourism objects in Bali Island. The opportunities and barriers of developing agrotourism from farmers’ opinions are clearly described in this chapter.

    This chapter also discusses the tourism stakeholders’ opinions on agrotourism development in Bali from entrepreneurs, governments, tourism industries, NGOs, universities, and local communities; as well as the contributions of agrotourism to the economy improvement of the local communities, social situation of local communities, and sustainable tourism development.

    4.1 A Glimpse of Bali

    Geographically Bali is located in Pacific Ocean exactly in East side of Java Island and Northwest Australia. Bali consists of Bali island and other small islands namely; Nusa Penida, Nusa Lembongan, Nusa Ceningan, and Menjangan islands covering area of 5,632.86 km2 width. Two volcanic mountains, Mount Agung (the highest of 3,142 meters), Mount Batur (1,717 meters) stretch in the middle part of Bali island and non volcanic mountains are Mount Merbuk (1,356 meters), Mount Patas (1,414 meters) and Mount Seraya (1,174 meters). Some of non-volcanic reach the height between 1,000 to 2,000 meters.


    Picture 4.1 Map of Bali Island.

    Bali Island approximates width of 85% from the total area. Mountains and hills are decorated and surrounded with green forest and agricultural areas which functioned as natural water sources for all parts of Bali. On the mountainous areas there are four lakes namely: Batur Lake, Beratan Lake , Buyan Lake, and Tamblingan lakes. The geographical condition separates Bali into two parts, North Bali with a narrow lowland plain and tideland plain; and South Bali with wide lowland plain. South Bali forms alluvial mainland passed by shallow rivers.

    Viewing from sloping land, most areas of Bali island consist of sloping land with the slope approximately 0-2% located in the South beach area and small part of the North beach, width area of 96,129 ha. Sloping land between 2-15% mostly located in Badung, Tabanan, Gianyar, Buleleng Regencies and the rest spread evenly along the beach with width of 132,056 ha. Sloping land between 15-40% covering area width 164,749 ha dominantly occupies middle part of Bali following the hill areas spread between West and East areas. While sloping area more than 40% is a hill and mountainside located in the middle part of Bali and parts of Nusa Penida Island.

    Bali has a tropic climate with average temperature between 25 and 32 Degree Celsius influenced by the high area. Bali has two seasons fixed by climate wind namely Dry Season (May – September) and Wet Season (October – April). Rain falls at anytime even during the Dry Season, however rain in the evening could drive away all the dust. The average rain falls is 178 mm and reaches 459 mm during the rainy season while the average humidity in Bali is 79% and the wind speed is between 3.0 and 8.3 knot per hour.

    Bali Province is divided into one city called Denpasar and 8 regencies namely Badung, Tabanan, Gianyar, Klungkung, Karangasem, Bangli, Buleleng, and Jembrana Regencies with the capital province in Denpasar. The total population of Bali Island is 2.998.770 people (Bali Statistic Bureau, 2000). The populations are not evenly spread, while Denpasar is the densest area with the dense population 3,218 people/km2.

    4.2 General Preview of Case Studies

    4.2.1 Bayung Gede Village, Kintamani District-Bangli Regency

    Bayung Gede is the first village surveyed to collect information relate to rural and agrotourism. It is a rural tourism projected by Government of Bali Regency located nearby the eco-tourism Kintamani which famous for beautiful sceneries of Batur Lake and active volcano Mount Batur. The main tourist attraction offered at Bayung Gede Village is “Kuburan Ari-ari” (placenta grave).

    The local communities of Bayung Gede Village believe it as spiritual of inhabitants of familiarity (picture 4.2). The district government of Bangli sees the potency and develop it become tourism object which added with some creations and innovations to enrich alternative tourist attractions in Bali.


    Picture 4.2
    Placenta Grave at Bayung Gede Village
    Source: Research Observation

    In addition, Bayung Gede Village also has other potencies such as orange farms and the beautiful panorama which developed as agrotourism (picture 4.3). Besides, lush vegetables grow in this village. Oranges and vegetables are currently produced to supply local markets in Bali Province. Tourists who visit Bayung Gede Village are dominantly still attracted by the unique of “Kuburan Ari-ari” although the village has lots potencies on agricultural resources (Bayung Gede Village Head, 2007).


    Picture 4.3
    Orange Farm at Bayung Gede Village
    Source: Research Observation

    4.2.2 Candi Kuning Village, Baturiti District-Tabanan Regency

    Candi Kuning Village is a project which was initiated by the district government of Baturiti, Tabanan Regency. Following the success story of Bedugul “Beratan Lake” and “Ulun Danu Temple” and the botanical garden of Eka Karya Bali (picture 4.4), the village is surveyed and promoted as agrotourism in Bali.


    Picture 4.4
    Eka Karya Botanical Garden
    Source: Research Observation

    The Eka Karya Botanical Garden is one of the leading tourist attractions in Tabanan Regency contributes lots to the local communities and stimulates related businesses such as flower “krisan” shops, vegetable traditional market, fruit “strawberry”, and organic plantations (picture 4.5). The main attractions of Candi Kuning Village are organic farm and beautiful panorama of Beratan Lake and Botanical Garden of Eka Karya Bali. Currently, visitors are dominated by domestic tourists who spend their week-ends of holidays for relaxation.

    Picture 4.5
    Vegetables and Fruits Market at Candi Kuning Village
    Source: Research Observation

    4.2.3 Blimbingsari Village, Melaya District, Jembrana Regency
    Blimbingsari is a small village of approximately 200 couple families, located in western part of Bali Province approximately 120 km from the Capital City of Denpasar. The village was formed and developed once the Dutch colonized Indonesia. It is predominantly populated by Christian Protestant communities. Albeit it becomes a Christian village, Blimbingsari still exists in Balinese culture and tradition practices (picture 4.6).


    Picture 4.6
    Balinese-style Church Building
    Source: Research Observation

    Predominantly, the populations work for agricultural sector. The cacao and coconut farms are the main products of Blimbingsari Village (Blimbingsari Village Head, 2007). The opportunity of Blimbingsari to become an agricultural attraction was motivated by “Suyaga Ayub”, a pastor of Blimbingsari church. Dominantly, tourists attracted by the unique traditions of Christian communities which are implemented by Balinese-style church and its story becomes one of the Christian villages in Bali.


    Picture 4.7
    Cacao and Coconut Farms
    Source: Research Observation

    The village is also nearby Palasari Village with Catholics populations, moreover it is both close to West Bali National Park which functions as ecotourism and conservation and Palasari water irrigation (DAM) which have been developed and promoted by the local government as tourist destination in Bali.

    4.2.4 Pelaga Village, Petang District, Badung Regency
    Pelaga is a small town in the middle part of Bali. It is surrounded by mountains and forests. The agrotourism at Pelaga is motivated by private entrepreneurs for the purpose of becoming motivators of farmers in Pelaga Village (Astawa, 2007).


    Picture 4.8
    Central of Pelaga Village
    Source: Research observation

    Agro Bagus Pelaga is one of the agrotourism objects developed by a Balinese entrepreneur named Sudibya. The main goal is to supply organic agricultural products like vegetables and fruits such as strawberry and tomato for hotel industries in Bali (picture 4.9). Currently, the tourists are attracted by beautiful panorama of mountain, rice fields, and organic farms as the main attractions (Local Community of Pelaga Village, 2007).


    Picture 4.9
    Strawberry Plantation at Pelaga Village
    Source: Research Observation

    4.3 Farmers’ Opinions toward Agrotourism Opportunities
    The perceptions of farmers toward agrotourism is predominantly characterized by the ideas that tourism and tourists provide them opportunities to increase family income, employment in the village, generating tourism business, and increase value of the village.
    Sixty farmers are chosen as respondents to agrotourism opportunities in their regions. The selected respondents are farmers who live and specifically work for agricultural sector in the case studies (15 farmers from Bayung Gede Village, 15 farmers from Candi Kuning Village, 15 farmers from Blimbingsari Village, and 15 farmers from Pelaga Village). The finding is shown in table 4.1 below:

    Table 4.1
    Farmers’ Opinions toward Agrotourism Opportunities
    —————————————-
    Case Study Code Indicators Total Score Mean Remark Rank
    —————————————-
    Bayung Gede Village, Kintamani District, Bangli Regency
    O3 Increasing family income 75 5.00 Strongly agree 1
    O2 Employment 73 4.87 Strongly agree 2
    O1 Generating tourism business 71 4.73 Strongly agree 3
    O4 Increasing value of the village 71 4.73 Strongly agree 3
    —————————————-
    Candi Kuning Village, Baturiti District, Tabanan Regency
    O3 Increasing family income 75 5.00 Strongly agree 1
    O2 Employment 72 4.80 Strongly agree 2
    O1 Generating tourism business 70 4.67 Strongly agree 3
    O4 Increasing value of the village 70 4.67 Strongly agree 3
    —————————————-
    Blimbingsari Village, Melaya District, Jembrana Regency
    O3 Increasing family income 75 5.00 Strongly agree 1
    O2 Employment 73 4.87 Strongly agree 2
    O1 Generating tourism business 72 4.80 Strongly agree 3
    O4 Increasing value of the village 72 4.80 Strongly agree 3
    —————————————-
    Pelaga Village, Petang District, Badung Regency
    O2 Employment 75 5.00 Strongly agree 1
    O3 Increasing family income 75 5.00 Strongly agree 1
    O1 Generating tourism business 71 4.73 Strongly agree 3
    O4 Increasing value of the village 71 4.73 Strongly agree 3
    —————————————-
    Source: Research Primary Data, 2007

    The finding in each case study is clearly elaborated below:

    1. Bayung Gede Village
    An agrotourism gives opportunity to increase the family income is strongly agreed by farmers as the mean of 5.00 shown in table 4.1 and reaches the highest rank compare to other indicators. Involvements of local communities in agrotourism development come afterward which accounts for mean of 4.87. Meanwhile generating potential tourism business and increasing value of the village are the least mean among others.

    2. Candi Kuning Village
    Farmers’ perceptions upon agrotourism development at Candi Kuning Village are also similar to farmers in Bayung Gede. As shown in the table 4.1, potency of agrotourism in increasing family income becomes the first reason which reaches the highest rank and mean which accounts for 5.00, followed with generating work opportunities as the second rank with total mean of 4.80. The last two indicators, potency of running tourism business and increasing value of the village nominate the lowest mean of 4.67 which then bring them to the last rank.

    3. Blimbingsari Village
    According to farmers at Blimbingsari Village, agrotourism development is definitely enable to increase the family income as proven by the utmost mean of 5.00 described in table 4.1. Local employment chance appoints the second rank. The lowly means among the four indicators are generating tourism income and increasing value of the village which account for 4.80 each.

    4. Pelaga Village
    Two opportunities of agrotourism development, local employment prospect and family income increase are the most opinions conveyed by the farmers at Pelaga Village which pass them to the first rank with each mean of 5.00. Potency of developing related tourism business and value increase are the lowest mean which accumulates only 4.73.

    5. Farmers’ perceptions toward agrotourism opportunities in the selected case studies
    Table 4.2 which presents 60 respondents who definitely agree that agrotourism enables to increase the family income as it occupies the highest mean (5.00) and first rank in all case studies. Involvements of local employees in agrotourism development position on the second rank with mean of 4.88. Meanwhile, the means of generating related tourism businesses and increasing value of the village account for 4.73 each which occupy the third rank.

    Table 4.2
    General Perceptions of Farmers toward Agrotourism Opportunities in Four Case Studies
    —————————————-
    Code Indicators Total Score Mean Remark Rank
    —————————————-
    O3 Increasing family income 300 5.00 Strongly agree 1
    O2 Employment 293 4.88 Strongly agree 2
    O1 Generating tourism business 284 4.73 Strongly agree 3
    O4 Increasing value of village 284 4.73 Strongly agree 3
    Source: Research Primary Data, 2007.
    —————————————-

    4.4 Barrier Factors of Agrotourism Development in Bali
    Five indicators which become the mains barrier factors in developing agrotourism such as lack of infrastructures, public facilities, human skill, investment, and government support questioned to 60 farmers in the four selected case studies. The finding is show at table 4.3 below:

    Table 4.3
    The Barriers Factors of Agrotourism Development in Bali
    Case Study Code Indicators Total Score Mean Remark Rank
    Bayung Gede Village, Kintamani District, Bangli Regency
    —————————————-
    B4 Lack of Infrastructures 69 4.60 Strongly agree 1
    B5 Lack of public facilities 69 4.60 Strongly agree 1
    B2 Lack of human skills 68 4.53 Strongly agree 3
    B1 Lack of investment 66 4.40 Strongly agree 4
    B3 Lack Government support 59 3.93 Agree 5
    —————————————-
    Candi Kuning Village, Baturiti District, Tabanan Regency
    B4 Lack of Infrastructures 71 4.73 Strongly agree 1
    B5 Lack of public facilities 70 4.67 Strongly agree 2
    B2 Lack of human skills 64 4.27 Strongly agree 3
    B1 Lack of investment 64 4.27 Strongly agree 4
    B3 Lack of Government support 59 3.93 Agree 5
    —————————————-
    Blimbingsari Village, Melaya District, Jembrana Regency
    B3 Lack of Government support 75 5.00 Strongly agree 1
    B2 Lack of human skills 71 4.73 Strongly agree 2
    B1 Lack of investment 71 4.73 Strongly agree 3
    B4 Lack of Infrastructures 71 4.73 Strongly agree 3
    B5 Lack of public facilities 70 4.67 Strongly agree 5
    —————————————-
    Pelaga Village, Petang District, Badung Regency
    B3 Lack of Government support 75 5.00 Strongly agree 1
    B2 Lack of human skills 72 4.80 Strongly agree 2
    B1 Lack of investment 72 4.80 Strongly agree 3
    B4 Lack of Infrastructures 72 4.80 Strongly agree 3
    B5 Lack of public facilities 70 4.67 Strongly agree 5
    —————————————-
    Source: Research Primary Data, 2007.

    The finding is evidently detailed below.

    1. Bayung Gede Village

    Inadequate infrastructure and public facilities are considered to be the most barrier factors of agrotourism development at Bayung Gede Village with mean of 4.60 as stated by the respondents in table 4.3. The mean of human resource skill is just under the two important indictors above which accounts for 4.53. The respondents also extremely agree that lack of investment becomes the fourth barrier factor of agrotourism development. Government support actually plays role in developing agrotourism, however the respondents regard it as the least barrier factor compare to other indicators.

    2. Candi Kuning Village

    At Candi Kuning Village, infrastructure scarce is predominantly regarded as the most barrier factor to establish agrotourism with mean of 4.73, then followed with the limited public facilities which positions on the second rank. Imperfect skill owned by the local communities becomes the third obstacle and surely stumble them to involve more in agrotourism. It has the same mean of 4.27 as negligible local investment which places on the fourth rank. The farmers in addition agree that the agrotourism development in their village is lack of government support.

    3. Blimbingsari Village

    The opinions of farmers at Bayung Gede and Candi Kuning villages toward agrotourism development are contrary with farmers at Blimbingsari Village since government support observed as the utmost barrier factor. Meanwhile, the limited human resource skill is considered to be the second hindrance, and then followed with scarce investment and infrastructures with mean of 4.37 which convey them to the third rank. The restricted public facilities are the slightest barrier factor of agrotourism development at Blimbingsari Village.

    4. Pelaga Village

    A similar opinion stated by the farmers at Blimbingsari Village where government support becomes the most problem and occupies the first rank compare to other four indicators. Inadequate human resource skill, scarce investment and lack of infrastructures have the same mean (4.80) which appoint the second and third ranks in sequence. In the meantime, public facilities assign the least barrier factor as shown by the mean of 4.67 described in table 4.3.

    5. Barrier factors agrotourism development in Bali

    According to the sixty selected respondents taken from the four case studies, whereas inadequate infrastructures are assumed as the most barrier factors in developing agrotourism in Bali compare to other four indicators. This fact can be evidently seen from the mean (4.72) presented in table 4.4. The means of limited public facilities and human resource skills are just seven points under infrastructure factor which account for 4.65. Investment scarce (mean of 4.55) and lacking government support (mean of 4.47) resemble the forth and fifth barrier factors of agrotourism development in Bali.

    Table 4.4
    The Barrier Factors of Agrotourism Development in Bali
    —————————————-
    Code Indicators Total Score Mean Remark Rank
    —————————————-
    B4 Lack of Infrastructures 283 4.72 Strongly agree 1
    B5 Lack of public facilities 279 4.65 Strongly agree 2
    B2 Lack of human skills 279 4.65 Strongly agree 2
    B1 Lack of investment 273 4.55 Strongly agree 4
    B3 Lack of government support 268 4.47 Strongly agree 5
    —————————————-
    Source: Research Primary Data, 2007.

    4.5 Stakeholders’ Opinions toward Agrotourism Development in Bali.
    Using SWOT Analysis, this paper attracts research finding by strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and treats factors in each case study before formulating the best strategy to develop agrotourism in Bali. The data collected through interview involving 35 respondents which comprise stakeholders from four local governments of Bayung Gede, Candi Kuning, Blimbingsari, and Pelaga Villages; and representative respondents from NGOs, universities, and hotelier (see appendix). The research finding can be described as below:

    1. Strengths
    The strengths of agrotourism development in Bali predominantly are resourced by ecological, social, and cultural resources. The surveyed strength factors used as indicators consist of lakes, rice fields, plantations, forests, rivers, existing farmers, unique traditions, agricultural organizations, events, agricultural ceremonies, organization linkages, human resources, agricultural regulations, information systems, and heritages (table 4.5).

    In general, the respondents who represent agrotourism stakeholders predominantly agree that ecological, and social and cultural resources are the strengths factors agrotourism development in Bali. More specifically, the stakeholders strongly agree that ecological resource particularly lakes, and social and cultural resources especially existing of farmers and unique traditions as the most strengths factors as means shown in table 4.5.

    Table 4.5
    The Strengths Factors of Agrotourism Development in Bali
    —————————————-
    Code Indicators Total Score Mean Remark Rank
    —————————————-
    Ecological Resources
    S5 Lakes 140 4.00 Strongly agree 1
    S1 Rice Fields 138 3.94 Agree 2
    S2 Plantations 132 3.77 Agree 3
    S3 Forests 128 3.66 Agree 4
    S4 Rivers 119 3.40 Neutral 5
    —————————————-
    Social and Cultural Resources
    S12 Farmers 160 4.57 Strongly agree 1
    S11 Unique traditions 150 4.29 Strongly agree 2
    S14 Agricultural organizations 145 4.14 Agree 3
    S10 Events 137 3.91 Agree 4
    S13 Agricultural ceremonies 136 3.89 Agree 5
    S6 Organization linkages 135 3.86 Agree 6
    S8 Human resources 133 3.80 Agree 7
    S15 Agriculture regulations 130 3.71 Agree 8
    S7 Information systems 127 3.63 Agree 9
    S9 Heritages 124 3.54 Agree 10
    —————————————-
    Source: Research Primary Data, 2007.

    2. Weaknesses

    Although the stakeholders agree that Bali has lots of strength factors to develop agrotourism, however the weaknesses factors also should be considered. The weakness factors comprise; lack of government support, lack of investment, lack of infrastructures, lack of human skills, and lack of public facilities as described in table 4.6.

    Table 4.6
    The Weakness Factors of Agrotourism Development in Bali
    —————————————-
    Code Indicators Total Score Mean Remark Rank
    —————————————-
    B3 Lack of government support 136 3.89 Agree 1
    B1 Lack of investment 132 3.77 Agree 2
    B4 Lack of Infrastructures 127 3.63 Agree 3
    B2 Lack of human skills 124 3.54 Agree 4
    B5 Lack of public facilities 100 2.86 Neutral 5
    —————————————-
    Source: Research Primary Data, 2007.
    —————————————-

    According to the stakeholders selected as respondents whereas the most weakness factor contributed to agrotorism development in Bali is lack of government support which its mean accounts for 3.89. Besides, lacks of investment and infrastructures as well as limited human skills are still regarded as the weaknesses factors. Yet public facilities are not supposed to be the weakness factors since its mean only reaches 2.86 and position on the last rank.

    3. Opportunities

    The stakeholders predominantly agree that the agrotourism development in Bali generates certain opportunities such as; creating local employment, increasing family income, increasing value of the village. In particular, generating related tourism business opportunities become the primary and most reasons (mean of 4.46) proposed by the respondents as presented in table 4.7.

    Table 4.7
    The Opportunities Factors of Agrotourism Development in Bali
    —————————————-
    Code Indicators Total Score Mean Remark Rank
    —————————————-
    O1 Generating tourism business 156 4.46 Strongly agree 1
    O2 Employment 142 4.06 Agree 2
    O3 Increasing family income 138 3.94 Agree 3
    O4 Increasing value of village 127 3.63 Agree 4
    —————————————-
    Source: Research Primary Data, 2007.

    4. Threats

    Basically threats toward agrotourism development are classified into two namely ecological threats which comprise degradation of natural resources, lands using problems, and pollutions; and social and cultural threats which comprise changing of hosts’ attitudes, increasing criminalities, and commercialization of traditions.

    The agrotourism stakeholders in Bali strongly agree that degradation of natural resources the most dangerous threat of any tourism developments including agrotourism in particular. It is clearly described by the mean of 4.51 shown in table 4.8. Land using problems are supposed to be the second most risky hazard which potential to destroy the existence and development of agrotourism in Bali. Meanwhile the last four indicators pollutions, changing of hosts’ attitudes, increasing criminalities, commercialization of tradition are consider to be the threats factors, yet they are not as significant as the two exposure factors as degradation of natural resource and land using problem.

    Table 4.8
    The Threats Factors of Agrotourism Development in Bali
    —————————————-
    Code Indicators Total Score Mean Remark Rank
    —————————————-
    Ecological Resources
    T3 Degradation natural resources 158 4.51 Strongly agree 1
    T1 Lands using problems 155 4.43 Strongly agree 2
    T2 Pollutions 146 4.17 Agree 3

    Social and Cultural Resources
    T5 Changing of host attitudes 144 4.11 Agree 1
    T6 Increasing criminalities 136 3.89 Agree 2
    T4 Commercialization of traditions 131 3.74 Agree 3
    —————————————-
    Source: Research Primary Data, 2007.

    5. Contributions of agrotourism toward economy improvement of the local communities
    Agrotourism contributes lots to the improvement of economy lives of the local communities. The contributions are in the forms of agricultural products sales, various of hand-made souvenirs or handicrafts sold for the tourists, chances to establish food stalls or restaurants and certain types of accommodation such as home-stay, bungalow, villa, and hotel, as well as village development. With respect to economy improvement, the stakeholders predominantly agree that increasing agricultural products are the most contribution generated from agrotourism development with mean of 3.97 as presented in table 4.9.

    Table 4.9
    The Contributions of Agrotourism toward Economy Improvement
    —————————————-
    Code Indicators Total Score Mean Remark Rank
    —————————————-
    CeL1 Increasing agriculture products 139 3.97 Agree 1
    CeL2 Increasing handicrafts/souvenirs 135 3.86 Agree 2
    CeL4 Increasing village restaurants 131 3.74 Agree 3
    CeL3 Increasing village hotels/villas 129 3.69 Agree 4
    —————————————-
    Source: Research Primary Data, 2007.

    6. Contributions of agrotourism toward improvement of social situation
    There are three indicators which empower the potency of agrotourism development such as poverty alleviation, decreasing the number of unemployment, and declining the urban. The stakeholders mostly agree that the agrotourism enables to alleviate poverties and decrease the unemployment since it provides work opportunities which can help to improve the quality of the villagers’ lives. These two contributions are considered to be the most essential contributions of agrotourism development in Bali as illustrated in table 4.10 below.

    Table 4.10
    The Contributions of Agrotourism toward Improvement of Social Situation
    —————————————-
    Code Indicators Total Score Mean Remark Rank
    —————————————-
    Csc1 Minimizing of poorness 132 3.77 Agree 1
    Csc3 Decreasing unemployed 132 3.77 Agree 1
    Csc2 Decreasing urbanizations 128 3.66 Agree 3
    —————————————-
    Source: Research Primary Data, 2007.

    7. Contributions of agrotourism toward sustainable tourism development

    Agrotourism development is highly expected to play role in applying sustainable tourism development in Bali. Stakeholders predominantly agree that the agrotourism development contributes toward nature conservation as one of the important goals of sustainable tourism (sustaining nature, social life, and culture, as well as generating income for the local societies) as describes in table 4.11.

    Table 4.11
    The Contributions of Agrotourism toward Sustainable Tourism Development
    —————————————-
    Code Indicators Total Score Mean Remark Rank
    —————————————-
    Cst3 Natural conservation 155 4.43 Strongly agree 1
    Cst2 Increasing tourists/visitors arrivals 147 4.20 Strongly agree 2
    Cst1 Continuity of business at villages 140 4.00 Agree 3
    —————————————-
    Source: Research Primary Data, 2007.

    Nowadays, tourists are more interested in visiting tourism destinations which serve natural attractions since their lives and educations improving day by day which encourage them to pay more attention nature and increase their awareness on the importance of saving the nature. This newly paradigm is expected to increase the number of tourists visiting Bali. The stakeholders also agree that agrotourism facilitates the local communities to run certain kinds of related tourism businesses in their villages.

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